What's the Difference Between Because and Because Of

grammar Jan 14, 2022

Because and because of have the same meaning, which is to introduce a reason. The difference is how we use them. Yeah, it's a grammar issue. 

We use because (without of) followed by a subject and verb. In other words, the pattern is because + a sentence. The tense of that sentence doesn't matter - you can have a past, present, or future sentence after because.

  • Because it was getting late, I went home.
  • Tom must be leaving the office because he’s putting on his jacket.
  • I like that restaurant because the food is good and the prices are reasonable

We use because of plus a noun. Like because, when because of comes at the beginning of the sentence, use a comma after the clause containing because of. When because of comes in the middle of the sentence, you don’t need a comma before because of.

  1. Because of the rain, we cancelled the picnic.
  2. Because of the time, I went home.
  3. She was unable to eat the cake because of her diet.

Be careful about one point. Don't use because of plus a time word. For example, you can’t say, “Because of October, the weather is getting cooler.” Instead, you can say, “Because it is October, the weather is getting cooler.”

Add your example sentence(s) in the comments below

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